MICKA_TITLE MICKA_ABSTRACT COMPANY_NAME COMPANY_EMAIL Sea-floor Quaternary Geology2019-07-16T17:33:45T00:00:002019-07-16T17:33:45T00:00:00This web map service shows the chronostratigraphic age of geological units of the seafloor originated in the Quaternary period (i.e. 2,588 Ma from now until today).
The data were compiled by BGR from the EMODnet geology partner organisations in the EMODnet Geology project phases II and III between 2009 and 2019.
The scale varies between 20 000 and 2 500 000.


Quaternary -lithology
This web map service shows the rock type (lithology) of geological units of the seafloor originated in the Quaternary period (i.e. 2,588 Ma from now until today).
The data were compiled by BGR from the EMODnet geology partner organisations in the EMODnet Geology project phases I, II and III between 2009 and 2019.
Metadata (ISO 19139 XML)
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Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR)Kristine.asch@bgr.de2019-07-16T00:00:0021.6852001533514 -79.178220541085 82.6865735601404 -79.178220541085 82.6865735601404 81.905089670756 21.6852001533514 81.905089670756 21.6852001533514 -79.178220541085
Sea-floor GeologyCopyright: European Community represented by the European Commission. The holders of the intellectual property rights (IPR) to the data, which existed prior to the Contract being entered into, are the EMODNET-Geology partners. The EMODNET-Geology partners (the IPR holders) give no warranty, condition or representation as to the quality, accuracy or completeness of the data, information, or service, or its suitability for any use or purpose. All implied conditions relating to the quality or suitability of the information, and all liabilities arising from the supply of the information (including any liability arising in negligence) are excluded to the fullest extent permitted by law.2019-07-16T17:33:43T00:00:002019-07-16T17:33:43T00:00:00Metadata (ISO 19139 XML)]]>Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR)Kristine.asch@bgr.de2019-07-16T00:00:0010.8374045872346 -85.9614638326784 83.2555573022459 -85.9614638326784 83.2555573022459 107.489398652076 10.8374045872346 107.489398652076 10.8374045872346 -85.9614638326784 Sea-floor Geomorphology2019-07-16T17:33:44T00:00:002019-07-16T17:33:44T00:00:00
The scale varies between 10 000 and 5 000 000.
Metadata (ISO 19139 XML)
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Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR)Kristine.asch@bgr.de2019-07-16T00:00:0010.8374045872346 -85.9614638326784 82.654837834257 -85.9614638326784 82.654837834257 107.489398652076 10.8374045872346 107.489398652076 10.8374045872346 -85.9614638326784
Sea-floor Pre-quaternary Faults2019-07-16T17:33:44T00:00:002019-07-16T17:33:44T00:00:00The data were compiled by BGR from the EMODnet geology partner organisations in the EMODnet Geology project phases I, II and III between 2009 and 2019 and the International Geological Map of Europe and Adjacent Areas (Asch, 2005).
The scale varies between 1:200 000 and 1:5 000 000
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Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR)Kristine.asch@bgr.de2019-07-16T00:00:0032.5032695870385 -62.9252759618387 82.5850100050587 -62.9252759618387 82.5850100050587 86.3257722752442 32.5032695870385 86.3257722752442 32.5032695870385 -62.9252759618387
Sea-floor Pre-Quaternary Bedrock Geology2019-07-16T17:33:44T00:00:002019-07-16T17:33:44T00:00:00This web map service shows the chronostratigraphic age of geological units of the seafloor originated earlier than 2,588 Ma from now (pre-Quaternary). International Geological Map of Europe and Adjacent Areas (Asch, 2005). The scale varies between 25,000 and 5 000 000.
The data were compiled by BGR from the EMODnet geology partner organisations in the EMODnet Geology project phases I, II and III between 2009 and 2019.

Pre-Quaternary -lithology
This web map service shows the rock type (lithology) of geological units of the seafloor originated earlier than 2,588 Ma from now (pre-Quaternary). International Geological Map of Europe and Adjacent Areas (Asch, 2005).
The scale varies between 25 000 and 5 000 000.
The data were compiled by BGR from the EMODnet geology partner organisations in the EMODnet Geology project phases I, II and III between 2009 and 2019.
The scale varies between 25 000 and 5 000 000.
Metadata (ISO 19139 XML)
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Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR)Kristine.asch@bgr.de2019-07-16T00:00:0018.6601918220093 -81.2774189722477 83.2555573022459 -81.2774189722477 83.2555573022459 103.122175849863 18.6601918220093 103.122175849863 18.6601918220093 -81.2774189722477
GE.IE.GSI.GEMASGSI GEMAS European Geochemical DataGE.IE.GSI.GEMAShttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/2008-01-12T00:00:00T00:00:002016-04-10T00:00:00T00:00:002016-04-10T00:00:00T00:00:00The Geochemical Mapping of Agricultural and Grazing Land Soil comprises more than 70 chemical elements and parameters determined on more than 4000 soil samples. The geochemistry of European agriculture and grazing soils are depicted graphically on maps of the GEMAS geochemical atlas.

In 2016 the Geological Survey of Ireland as a European partner contributes to GEMAS and EGDI (European Geological Data Infrastructure) with provision of a GIS spatial data classification and publication of WMS geochemical web mapping services to support European data interoperability of EGDI web portal.

The GIS GEMAS sample classification were constructed in ArcGIS 10.1 and the original GEMAS dataset is available as ESRI shapefile format.
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Geological Survey Irelandinfo@gsi.ie2018-09-14T00:00:0051.44555 -10.47472 55.37999 -10.47472 55.37999 -6.01306 51.44555 -6.01306 51.44555 -10.47472
Coastal migration via satellite data (0-40k)2019-07-15T10:15:07T00:00:002019-07-15T10:15:07T00:00:00Visualising pan-European shoreline change means making choices, like defining a stable shoreline for example. A mean rate of 0.5 metre per year was chosen, though this rate depends on the landscape: granite cliffs for example shows less decadal dynamics compared to a sandy barrier island.
The spatial resolution of the method, depending on the pixel resolution of the individual satellite images which is about 10 metres, is still limiting. Validations of abovementioned method have shown that the method is less accurate in case of bluffs, cliffs and muddy coasts, and as such further validations will need to take place. EMODnet Geology hopes that by releasing the satellite-based dataset now, coastal experts and other end users will be able to discover and communicate possibilities and limitations of automated methods for the extraction of shoreline position and quantification of annual to decadal change. To help in this process, a companion map showing shoreline migration on the basis of field data and expert is made available, thereby facilitating a first-order comparison.
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Geological Survey of the Netherlands (TNO)sytze.vanheteren@tno.nl2019-07-15T00:00:0033.6606674194336 -24.895299911499 71.3595352172852 -24.895299911499 71.3595352172852 54.2765083312988 33.6606674194336 54.2765083312988 33.6606674194336 -24.895299911499
Entity IndexesCopyright: European Community represented by the European Commission. The holders of the intellectual property rights (IPR) to the data, which existed prior to the Contract being entered into, are the EMODNET-Geology partners. The EMODNET-Geology partners (the IPR holders) give no warranty, condition or representation as to the quality, accuracy or completeness of the data, information, or service, or its suitability for any use or purpose. All implied conditions relating to the quality or suitability of the information, and all liabilities arising from the supply of the information (including any liability arising in negligence) are excluded to the fullest extent permitted by law.2019-07-15T10:15:04T00:00:002019-07-15T10:15:04T00:00:00Metadata (ISO 19139 XML)]]>EMODnet Geologybpj@geus.dk2019-07-15T00:00:007.93579578399658 -29.2976837158203 92.1766510009766 -29.2976837158203 92.1766510009766 36.9345817565918 7.93579578399658 36.9345817565918 7.93579578399658 -29.2976837158203 Costal BehaviorCopyright: European Community represented by the European Commission. The holders of the intellectual property rights (IPR) to the data, which existed prior to the Contract being entered into, are the EMODNET-Geology partners. The EMODNET-Geology partners (the IPR holders) give no warranty, condition or representation as to the quality, accuracy or completeness of the data, information, or service, or its suitability for any use or purpose. All implied conditions relating to the quality or suitability of the information, and all liabilities arising from the supply of the information (including any liability arising in negligence) are excluded to the fullest extent permitted by law.2019-07-15T10:15:06T00:00:002019-07-15T10:15:06T00:00:00Metadata (ISO 19139 XML)]]>Geological Survey of the Netherlands (TNO)sytze.vanheteren@tno.nl2019-07-15T00:00:0033.6040954589844 -24.9027347564697 71.3702774047852 -24.9027347564697 71.3702774047852 54.290111541748 33.6040954589844 54.290111541748 33.6040954589844 -24.9027347564697 Coastal migration via satellite data2019-07-15T10:15:06T00:00:002019-07-15T10:15:06T00:00:00protection and recreation. It is constantly modified by wind, waves and tides, and impacted by human activity.
Hence, the decadal change of shorelines reflect natural processes as well as human influence, whether positive
or negative. Climatic-driven changes such as sea level rise, higher waves and changes in wind direction put
increasing pressure on many of Europe’s shorelines.
Knowing how, and at what rate, our coasts are changing is the first step to successfully managing them. The
new EMODnet Geology shoreline-migration map, released today, allows users to visualise pan-European coastal
behaviour for 2007-2017 at different spatial scales. A built-in search and zoom functionality allows online users
to distinguish areas of landward migration (erosion or submergence), stability, and seaward migration (accretion
or emergence). The underlying, downloadable satellite-based dataset offers additional information on annual
values and uncertainty.
With the new map, international policy makers can determine large-scale coastal vulnerability while national
and regional coastal managers are able to fill existing gaps in field-monitoring data and to identify potential
areas of rapid change. The map also provides the general public with a useful insight into one of Europe’s most
obvious climate-change effects. Most importantly, scientists may explain spatial patterns and provide feedback
on methodological advantages as well as shortcomings, thus helping to optimise the big-data methodology
used.
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Geological Survey of the Netherlands (TNO)sytze.vanheteren@tno.nl2019-07-15T00:00:0033.6040954589844 -24.9027347564697 71.3702774047852 -24.9027347564697 71.3702774047852 54.290111541748 33.6040954589844 54.290111541748 33.6040954589844 -24.9027347564697