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Marine aggregates comprise near-shore deposits of non-metallic detrital minerals and calcium carbonate. They occur both on beaches and on deeper seabed areas and are principally mined for use in the construction industry. Concentrated into their present occurrences by hydrodynamic processes, aggregates may have originally been deposited by mechanisms such as river or glacial deposition.
Metadata Contact: Geological Survey Ireland (GSI), Ireland, Date Stamp: 2019-07-16
The aggregate deposits presented here comprise near-shore deposits of non-metallic detrital minerals and calcium carbonate. They occur both on beaches and deeper seabed areas. Marine aggregate deposits are principally extracted for use in the construction industry. Concentrated into their present occurrences by hydrodynamic processes, aggregates may have originally been deposited by mechanisms such as river or glacial deposition.
Metadata Contact: Geological Survey Ireland (GSI), Ireland, Date Stamp: 2019-07-16
Submerged archaeological sites subdivided as: 1. Cave site; 2. Open air site; 3. Settlement; 4. Other. Chronological information is presented as calendar age BP. Confidence is defined as follows: 1. High: Sampled feature with good age and palaeoenvironmental control. 2. Sampled feature with poor or none age and palaeoenvironmental control. 3. Constructed by remote sensing data only. 4. Low: Reasonable without any direct evidence.
Metadata Contact: British Geological Survey, United Kingdom, Date Stamp: 2019-07-16
Submerged archaeological sites subdivided as: 1. Cave site; 2. Open air site; 3. Settlement; 4. Other. Chronological information is presented as calendar age BP. Confidence is defined as follows: 1. High: Sampled feature with good age and palaeoenvironmental control. 2. Sampled feature with poor or none age and palaeoenvironmental control. 3. Constructed by remote sensing data only. 4. Low: Reasonable without any direct evidence.
Metadata Contact: British Geological Survey, United Kingdom, Date Stamp: 2019-07-16
This data set is a compilation of all known marine points with geological knowledge. From this index, you can get an overview on available geological knowledge for European seas together with contact information for further details.
Metadata Contact: EMODnet Geology, Danmark, Date Stamp: 2019-07-16
Coastal and submarine springs subdivided as:1. Coastal; 2. Submarine; 3. Other.Where information on the genesis of the feature is available that is also given e.g. geological fault (FEA_GEN_TY). The rate of flow in m3 / second is specified if known.Confidence is defined as follows:1. High: Sampled feature with good age and palaeoenvironmental control. 2. Sampled feature with poor or none age and palaeoenvironmental control. 3. Constructed by remote sensing data only. 4. Low: Reasonable without any direct evidence.
Metadata Contact: British Geological Survey, United Kingdom, Date Stamp: 2019-07-16
Coastal Landforms created during periods of lower sea level. These features may or may not be submerged today (e.g. as a result of isostatic rebound). Where possible these have been subdivided into the type of Coastal Landform e.g. Beachrock, Littoral deposit, Coastal dunes, Cliff, Sand bars, beach ridges, Other.Where information is available on the genesis of the beach deposit this has been provided, e.g. foreshore sediment, aeolian sediment (e.g. dunes).Where information on sediment grain size and composition is available this has been provided. Uncemented/cemented (e.g. beach rock).Chronological information is presented as calendar age BP.Confidence is defined as follows:1. High: Sampled feature with good age and palaeoenvironmental control. 2. Sampled feature with poor or none age and palaeoenvironmental control. 3. Constructed by remote sensing data only. 4. Low: Reasonable without any direct evidence.
Metadata Contact: British Geological Survey, United Kingdom, Date Stamp: 2019-07-16
Coastal Landforms created during periods of lower sea level. These features may or may not be submerged today (e.g. as a result of isostatic rebound). Where possible these have been subdivided into the type of Coastal Landform e.g. Beachrock, Littoral deposit, Coastal dunes, Cliff, Sand bars, beach ridges, Other.Where information is available on the genesis of the beach deposit this has been provided, e.g. foreshore sediment, aeolian sediment (e.g. dunes).Where information on sediment grain size and composition is available this has been provided. Uncemented/cemented (e.g. beach rock).Chronological information is presented as calendar age BP.Confidence is defined as follows:1. High: Sampled feature with good age and palaeoenvironmental control. 2. Sampled feature with poor or none age and palaeoenvironmental control. 3. Constructed by remote sensing data only. 4. Low: Reasonable without any direct evidence.
Metadata Contact: British Geological Survey, United Kingdom, Date Stamp: 2019-07-16
The shoreline is a highly dynamic land-sea interface that provides important services such as ecology, floodprotection and recreation. It is constantly modified by wind, waves and tides, and impacted by human activity.Hence, the decadal change of shorelines reflect natural processes as well as human influence, whether positiveor negative. Climatic-driven changes such as sea level rise, higher waves and changes in wind direction putincreasing pressure on many of Europe’s shorelines.Knowing how, and at what rate, our coasts are changing is the first step to successfully managing them. Thenew EMODnet Geology shoreline-migration map, released today, allows users to visualise pan-European coastalbehaviour for 2007-2017 at different spatial scales. A built-in search and zoom functionality allows online usersto distinguish areas of landward migration (erosion or submergence), stability, and seaward migration (accretionor emergence). The underlying, downloadable satellite-based dataset offers additional information ...
Metadata Contact: Geological Survey of the Netherlands (TNO), The Netherlands, Date Stamp: 2019-07-16
Thanks to the public availability of satellite data (optical imagery of ESA Sentinel 2 and NASA Landsat 5, 7 & 8 with pixel resolutions of 10-30 metres and a revisit time of 1 to 2 weeks) and new analytical tools for processing big data (such as the Google Earth Engine), the EMODnet Geology team in collaboration with Deltares and TNO (Geological Survey of the Netherlands) were able to look at shoreline migration in a new way. Scripts for automated detection of the land-water boundary were used to separate land from water in annual image composites for the period 2007-2017. During this process, data points were generated for each part along the European shoreline. These points were then averaged by year and analysed for a decadal period. Visualising pan-European shoreline change means making choices, like defining a stable shoreline for example. A mean rate of 0.5 metre per year was chosen, though this rate depends on the landscape: granite cliffs for example shows less decadal dynamics compared to a sandy ba...
Metadata Contact: Geological Survey of the Netherlands (TNO), The Netherlands, Date Stamp: 2019-07-16
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